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Santa Fe Springs Custom Dual Function Light Rescue

paramedic response unit

Santa Fe Springs came to us with a unique request for a dual function squad unit; this concept is different than most of our trucks but we were able to completely customize this vehicle to meet the customers needs. This rescue unit was designed to be used for environmental incidents and medical rescues. Built on a Dodge 3500 with a Cummins 350 HP Diesel engine, this unit is functional and efficient.

This unit will be used for hazardous situations a few times a month. It will also be called out to investigations, inspections and follow-ups. Santa Fe Spring’s previous environmental response unit lacked protection of hazardous waste materials during transport, installing a ROM Roll-Up Door was a the solution. The bullet lined bed of the truck is designed to safely carry 55 gallon drums. The back of this unit also features a swing-out sampling system with test tubes, clean-up kits, spill kits, and an in-cab refrigerator to keep samples cool on the way to the lab.

Although this truck is primarily used for environmental response, it was important for Santa Fe Springs to have the dual functionality of a rescue as well. This rig is equipped with Code 3 running equipment, ability to transmit out, and a hearing system outfitted for paramedic use. This vehicle has 6 compartments in the body with roll up doors, LED strip lighting, adjustable shelves, and dual slide outs for easy access to equipment.

ENGINE SPECIFICATIONS & FEATURES

2017 Dodge Ram® 3500, SLT, 4x2, Single Rear Wheel

52 Gallon Fuel Tank

ROM Roll-Up Door

Dual Slides

6.7L Cummins Turbo Diesel

Whelen Light Package

Code-3 Running Equipment

Adjustable Shelves

Air Compressor

Swing Out Sampling System w/Test Tubes

Monitor Equipment Station

Refrigerator for Sample Transport

Technical Reference Station

Bullet Lined Platform

Chassis – 2017 Dodge Ram 3500, SLT, 4×2, single rear wheel.

While this may not work for your department, it might be worth it for you to consider building a smaller vehicle for your department. In any case, when designing your new vehicle, take into consideration what the vehicle will be used for and plan for the future. Boise Mobile Equipment will work with your department to design an apparatus to meet your communities needs. For inquiries on this unit or another feel free to contact us at sales@bmefire.com or (208) 338-1444.

BME Receives 3 Separate Awards from USFS

USFS fire trucks

In the month of September, Boise Mobile Equipment (BME) has received three separate awards totaling over $15 million for production of firefighting apparatuses for the United States Forest Service (USFS). BME will produce 60 wildland engines for the USFS with an option for a 25% increase.

On the order? Type 3’s, Type 3 Heavy, and Type 4’s; which will be ready for delivery in 2019. These wildland fire trucks will be delivered to multiple locations across 10 western states.

Boise Mobile Equipment is a fire truck manufacturer located in Boise, Idaho who has been servicing the nation’s fire, police, and emergency response professionals since 1990. BME fire apparatuses are manufactured to perform in rough terrain and extreme firefighting conditions. BME is dedicated to providing departments with custom design options, superior craftsmanship, and rugged durability. BME offers various types of emergency vehicles including pumpers, tenders, rescues, Wildland Type 3’s, 4’s and 6’s, and a variety of command vehicles. In addition, BME provides equipment and services to law enforcement with its command vehicles, complete up-fitting, and K-9 units.

Aside from its work with US Forest Service, BME has manufactured fire apparatus for CAL FIRE, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), National Park Service (NPS) and multiple municipal and county fire departments throughout the United States.

Interested in purchasing a BME wildland apparatus? Feel free to email us at sales@bmefire.com or visit our wildland page for more information!

Boise Mobile Equipment Apparatus Doors Featured in Firehouse Magazine

apparatus doors

We are proud of the doors we build on our fire apparatus and were recently featured in a Firehouse Magazine article explaining why. Below are some highlights on Larry Segreto’s conversation with Ed Ballam about Boise Mobile Equipments doors.

“Boise Mobile Equipment (BME) an apparatus builder in Boise, ID, with a specialty in wildland apparatus, sells more rigs with form and welded cabinet doors, bucking an industry trend.

Larry Segreto, vice president of BME, said that most of his customers work in very dusty environments and they prefer form welded doors because of the conditions.

“They want doors that work,” Segreto said. “Not to throw stones, but they don’t seem to want roll-up doors.”

Additionally Segreto said BME is “extremely proud” of its doors. He said the company uses aluminum structural tubing for the frame and uses aluminum stress skins on front and back with sheet foam sandwiched between. They also use piano-style hinges with oversized pins to reduce play and wear, Segreto said. “There’s less room for dirt that way,” he added.

As a testimony to the strength of BME doors, Segreto said he once had a customer leave the overhead doors of his apparatus inadvertently open and the doors ended up cutting off five palm trees before being noticed. “Our doors are constructed that heavy,” Segreto said, adding the final door assembly is about two inches thick.

Because of the dusty conditions in which his customers work, BME dovetails the doors into the body and uses a neoprene bulb seal to keep the dust out of the compartments.

“The strength of the door jamb is just as important as the door,” Segreto said. “We want solid framing to the door and we do know that flimsy bodies mean a lot of flex and a lot of popped doors and we don’t want that.”

To read the entire article by Firehouse Magazine please click here.

CAL FIRE Type 3 Wildland Update

Cal Fire Wildland Firetrucks

In August of 2017, Boise Mobile Equipment (BME) was awarded roughly $10 million to produce over thirty Type 3 wildland firefighting apparatuses for the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, better known as CAL FIRE. Since the initial contract CAL FIRE has now ordered 60 Wildland Type 3 trucks from BME. Here is a brief look inside our production timeline:

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Escalon Put’s Xtreme Type 6 Brush Truck to Work

Xtreme type 6 brush truck

The very first Xtreme Aggressive Type 6 ever built by Boise Mobile Equipment (BME), was recently added to the Escalon Fire Departments fleet. The Xtreme Type 6 pushes the ability of Quick Attack for emergency vehicles. BME wanted to create a custom manufactured brush truck that could exceed the capabilities of current trucks on the market. This brush truck was being used as a demo unit prior to being purchased by Escalon Fire Department. This brush truck was put into service on July 30 and utilized the same day on a grass and brush fire in Escalon.

The Xtreme 6 recently made an appearance in the Escalon Times along with firefighters Connor Coker and Ron Gur. Escalon Fire Chief Rick Mello commented on the departments new truck saying, “Essentially it carries 300 gallons of water and has a smaller capacity pump; it is built for wildland firefighting, it’s able to get to areas that are not accessible to larger engines. It carries hand tools, it has a portable pump so we can get water on site … it gives us a few more options.” Read the entire article here on the Escalon Times website.

We believe the Xtreme Type 6 is a great example of BME’s passion to build fire trucks that are ‘go anywhere’ vehicles. For more information, photo’s, specs and engineering behind this Aggresive truck visit our Wildland Xtreme 6 Page. Ready to add an Xtreme 6 to your department or having question? We can be reached at sales@bmefire.com or by phone at (208) 338-1444. 

 

Stock vs Custom Fire Trucks

stock vs custom firetrucks

When the time comes to purchase a new fire apparatus for your department, making the right decision may require some effort. It’s important to factor in safety concerns, community needs, and your department when researching trucks.

To aid with decision making, we want to outline some advantages to choosing a stock truck, as well as the benefits to purchasing a custom build. These points should be considered to make an informed decision for your department.

Choosing a Stock Truck

One of the biggest advantages to purchasing a stock truck is being able to view the truck in person and purchase it immediately. If your department is in a bind for a new apparatus, purchasing a stock truck may be your best option.

To see a Boise Mobile Equipment (BME) truck in person, please contact our facility – we can direct you to the fire department nearest you that is utilizing one of our trucks or arrange a time for you to visit us in Boise.

Although our stock trucks are completed, we have the ability to customize them to an extent to fit your needs. We have a variety of options that can be added to our stock trucks after they are completed such as slide outs, ladder racks, LED lighting, extended bumpers, and other options.

It’s beneficial to see a fire apparatus in person whether during the researching or buying phase. Visiting shops helps you determine exactly what type of truck you need or what you can expect to get when you purchase.

We also welcome visitors to our manufacturing facility to see our trucks currently in production and browse existing inventory ready for immediate delivery. Of course, the other major advantage to buying a stock truck is that the cost can be lower than a custom truck.

If your fire department is working with a tight budget, stock trucks may be your best option. BME sells directly to their customers which allows us to keep costs down.

Purchasing a Custom Build

Although buying a custom truck can cost you more, your new fire apparatus can include everything you need to serve your community. Get exactly what you want with our extensive options and specific instructions for our build team. In the event that BME has the chassis available in stock, the build time would be even less. A custom-built fire truck will take more planning from your department, but that forethought will produce the fire apparatus your department needs!

It’s critical to consider all of your options when choosing between buying a stock or custom truck. The same quality and craftsmanship goes into each apparatus, the difference comes down to your departments need and having the best truck to fill it. Considering the benefits to buying a stock or custom fire apparatus is important when making your purchasing decision. Whether you decide on a stock or custom truck, the same quality and craftsmanship goes into every apparatus we build. We have taken firefighters’ ideas and incorporated them into a winning versatile package with the best price point in the industry. Either way the truck will be customized to your desired needs and to fit your department

BME is available as a knowledgeable source to help you acquire the right fire truck for your department. Contact us today with any questions or inquiries!

Tag-On Opportunities

Are there financial benefits for a fire department to purchase an exact replica of a rig you’ve previously built? Absolutely.

BME has been awarded roughly $10 million to produce Model 34s for the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, better known as Cal Fire. We are currently offering “tag-on” opportunities to California fire departments with our Cal Fire Model 34 Wildland Apparatus.

“Tagging-on” is a common method used by fire departments during the purchasing process. Rather than undergo the traditional bidding process, which can often take up to a year, fire departments are able to “tag-on” to another department’s purchase order, allowing them to add their own purchases to the existing order. By tagging on to this purchase order, fire departments are able to get their fire apparatus in a fast, efficient and cost-effective way.

If your department is interested in tagging on, contact sales@bmefire.com or call (800) 445-8342 to be connected with a sales representative.

Wildfire Prevention & Preparedness

wildfire prevention and prepardness

As more individuals build their homes in woodland settings — in or near forests, rural areas or remote mountain sites, they enjoy the beauty of the environment but face the very real danger of wildfire. Every year across the U.S., major wildfires test homeowners and firefighters, some homes survive while many others do not. Those that survive almost always do so because their owners had prepared for the eventuality of fire, which is an inescapable force of nature in fire-prone woodland areas. Another way we think of it as, if it’s predictable, it’s preventable!

Wildfires often begin unnoticed; usually triggered by lightning or accidents. They spread quickly, igniting brush, trees and homes. Reduce your risk by preparing now — before wildfire strikes. Meet with your family to decide what to do and where to go if wildfires threaten your area. Follow the steps listed below to protect your family, home and property.

Protect Your Home

It is recommended that you create a 30 to 100 foot safety zone around your home, within this area, you can take steps to reduce potential exposure to flames and radiant heat. Homes built in pine forests should have a minimum safety zone of 100 feet. If your home sits on a steep slope, standard protective measures may not suffice. Contact your local fire department or forestry office for additional information.

Create a Perimeter Checklist:

  • Rake leaves, dead limbs and twigs, and clear out all flammable vegetation
  • Remove leaves and rubbish from under structures
  • Thin a 15-foot space between tree crowns, and remove limbs within 15 feet of the ground
  • Remove dead branches that extend over the roof
  • Prune tree branches and shrubs within 15 feet of a stovepipe or chimney outlet
  • Ask the power company to clear branches from power lines
  • Remove vines from the walls of the home
  • Mow grass regularly
  • Clear a 10-foot area around propane tanks and the barbecue
  • Place a screen over the barbecue grill—use non flammable material with mesh no coarser than one quarter inch
  • Regularly dispose of newspapers and rubbish at an approved site and follow local burning regulations
  • Place stove, fireplace and grill ashes in a metal bucket, soak in water for 2 days; then bury the cold ashes in mineral soil
  • Store gasoline, oily rags and other flammable materials in approved safety cans, and place the cans in a safe location away from the base of buildings
  • Stack firewood at least 100 feet away and uphill from your home, and clear combustible material within 20 feet
  • Use only wood-burning devices evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)
  • Review your homeowner's insurance policy and also prepare/update a list of your home's contents

Plan Ahead

  • Identify and maintain an adequate outside water source such as a small pond, cistern, well, swimming pool, or hydrant.
  • Have a garden hose that is long enough to reach any area of the home and other structures on the property.
  • Install freeze-proof exterior water outlets on at least two sides of the home and near other structure on the property. Install additional outlets at least 50 feet from the home.
  • Consider obtaining a portable gasoline powered pump in case electrictrical power is cut off.

Emergency Supplies

When wildfire threatens you won’t have time to shop or search for supplies. Assemble a disaster supplies kit with items you may need if advised to evacuate. Store these supplies in sturdy, easy-to-carry containers such as backpacks, duffle-bags, or trash containers.

Below are some essential items to include:

wildland fire prepardness
  • A 3-day supply of water (one gallon per person, per day) and food that won’t spoil
  • One change of clothing and footwear per person
  • One sleeping bag or blanket per person
  • A first aid kit that includes your family’s prescription medications
  • Emergency tools including a battery-powered radio, flashlight, and plenty of extra batteries
  • An extra set of car keys, credit card, cash, or travelers checks
  • Sanitation supplies
  • Special items for infant, elderly, or disabled family members
  • An extra pair of eyeglasses

During a Wildfire

If advised to evacuate, do so immediately. Take your disaster supply kit, lock your home and choose a route away from the fire hazard. Watch for changes in the speed and direction of the fire and smoke. Tell someone when you left and where you are going. If you see a wildfire and haven’t received evacuation orders yet, call 9-1-1. Don’t assume that someone else has already called. Describe the location of the fire, speak slowly. Describe the location of the fire, speak slowly and clearly, and answer any questions asked by the dispatcher. If you are not ordered to evacuate and have time to prepare your home, FEMA recommends you take the following actions:

  • Arrange temporary housing at a friend or relative’s home outside the threatened area in case you need to evacuate
  • Wear protective clothing when outside — sturdy shoes, cotton or woolen clothes, long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, gloves and a handkerchief to protect your face
  • Gather fire tools such as a rake, axe, handsaw or chainsaw, bucket and shovel
  • Close outside attic, eaves and basement vents, windows, doors, pet doors, etc. Remove flammable drapes and curtains
  • Close all shutters, blinds or heavy non-combustible window coverings to reduce radiant heat
  • Close all doors inside the house to prevent draft
  • Open the damper on your fireplace, but close the fireplace screen
  • Shut off any natural gas, propane or fuel oil supplies at the source
  • Connect garden hoses to outdoor water faucet and fill any pools, hot tubs, garbage cans, tubs or other large containers with water
  • Place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near above-ground fuel tanks, and leave the sprinklers on, dowsing these structures as long as possible
  • If you have gas-powered pumps for water, make sure they are fueled and ready

If asked to evacuate…

  • Place a ladder against the house in clear view to aid firefighters
  • Disconnect any automatic garage door openers so that doors can still be opened by hand if the power goes out, and close all garage doors
  • Place valuable papers, mementos and anything “you can’t live without” inside the car in the garage, ready for quick departure
  • Any pets still with you should also be put in the car
  • Place valuables that will not be damaged by water in a pool or pond
  • Move flammable furniture into the center of the residence away from the windows and sliding-glass doors
  • Turn on outside lights and leave a light on in every room to make the house more visible in heavy smoke

Practice Wildfire Safety

Every year wildfires destroy thousands of homes and businesses all over the United States. This is why it is so important to be aware of the potential for wildfires and to always take steps to prevent a fire from spreading. People start most wildfires, find out how you can promote and practice wildfire safety.  

california wildifres using bme firetrucks
  • Contact your local fire department, health department, or forestry office for information on fire laws.
  • Make sure that fire vehicles can get to your home. Clearly mark all driveway entrances and display your name and address.
  • Report hazardous conditions that could cause a wildfire.
  • Teach children about fire safety, be sure to keep matches out of their reach.
  • Post fire emergency telephone numbers.
  • Ensure adequate accessibility by large fire vehicles to your property.
  • Plan several escape routes away from your home, both by car and foot.
  • Talk to your neighbors about wildfire safety. Plan how the neighborhood could work together after a wildfire. Make a list of your neighbors’ skills such as medical or technical. Consider how you could help your neighbors who have special needs such as elderly or disabled persons. Make plans to take care of children who may be on their own if parents can’t get home.
  • Keep important family documents in a waterproof container. Assemble a smaller version of your kit to keep in the trunk of your car.
  • Wildfires often begin unnoticed. They spread quickly, igniting brush, trees and homes. Reduce your risk by preparing now before a wildfire strikes. Meet with your family to decide what to do

BME Featured in Fire Apparatus Magazine

bme featured in fire apparatus

Boise Mobile Equipment was recently highlighted in a Fire Apparatus Magazine article about discharges and inlets. The article discusses the different assortment of inlets and outlets, according to tactical needs on today’s fire apparatus. Below is a quote from Larry Segreto that was featured in the article.
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Wildland Firefighter Week of Remembrance

Wildland Firefighter

Over many decades, lessons learned from accidents and fatalities that have occurred on wildland fires have led to significant improvements in firefighter education, training, operational practices, and risk management processes. Unfortunately, wildland firefighting remains inherently hazardous, and we continue to experience accidents and fatalities.
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Have you heard… Boise Mobile Equipment is Moving!

bme is moving
BME HAS MOVED TO A LARGER AND MORE FUNCTIONAL BUILDING!

We are proud to announce that due to our remarkable growth and increasing demand, we have moved to a new location. Boise Mobile Equipment (BME) is known best for being the industry leader in the wildland market. We acquired two new facilities: one 25,000 square feet, and one 50,000 square feet, to give us adequate space to produce new firefighting vehicles.

Our new address 5656 W Morris Hill Rd, Boise, is where we will continue to give our customers the same quality service as before. The new location allows more room for manufacturing and innovating product.

The following items will remain the same:

PHONE #

Toll Free: (800) 445-8342
Phone: (208) 338-1444

HOURS

Monday through Friday: 8 am to 5 pm
Saturday and Sunday: Closed

Due to the nature of a large move, some departments may still be at our 900 Boeing Street location until the move is complete. Feel free to contact us with any questions.

Unfortunately, during the move, our phone lines will be down and access to our computers will be limited. If you need to get in contact with the office, please send an email to info@bmefire.com.
We apologize in advance for any inconveniences.

WANT TO CHECK OUT OUR NEW DIGS?

We will be hosting a Facebook Live, sharing photos, and a grand opening will be announced once our move is complete!

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