Blog

Be Safe, Protecting First Responders

bme partners with tiffany's pennies

With everything going on in the world right now, it is important for us to take the time to honor and thank those who continue to sacrifice their lives while keeping us safe on a daily basis. We take great pride in the work that we do and the opportunity we have been given to serve the fire and police industry through each division at Boise Mobile Equipment. Our Emergency Vehicle Upfitting Division has recently found a remarkable young person we’ve asked to join the BME team, sharing her support and compassion for first responders. It’s not every day that you see a 10 year dedicating their time to paying it forward, but Tiffany isn’t your average 10 year old! With her love for Police, Fire, Military and EMS; Tiffany is truly making a difference and showing her appreciation for first responders one penny at a time! Inspired by Tiffany’s Pennies, we knew we wanted to be associated with her and her journey.

Tiffany's Pennies

“Tiffany is 10 years old and Lives in Michigan. She has ALWAYS loved her police, police K9, fire, military, and EMS people. She has always told them thank you and be safe. After the Ferguson Riots we explained what was happening and after that Tiffany wanted to give the police officers a gift. Since I already do metal stamping, we came up with using a penny for luck.

I would hand stamp BE SAFE and Tiffany would stamp the heart.(easy to carry, her words, win win for all of us). She has me carry them in my purse so whenever she sees them, she can give them out.

Tiffany has now been handing them out for 6 years. From Michigan to Hawaii and everywhere we have been in between. She does it to show her support and her love to those who keep us safe. She has on occasion made it into the spotlight. However she would rather do it quietly and under the radar. We as her parents are very proud of her. After multiple people have asked if she has a website, I have decided to make her a fb page so everyone can follow her journey. Tiffany and I have been told how much these pennies mean to the people who have received them.

  • She is a normal girl
  • She loves playing hockey
  • Riding her bike
  • Swimming
  • And going on adventures
  • With a big heart

We truly appreciate all those who work so hard to keep us safe. Hope ya all enjoy her lifetime journey

Sincerely,

The Demski”

tiffany's pennies
tiffany's pennies
tiffany's pennies

First Responders Receiving Pennies

Symbolism of a Penny

Have you ever walked down the street and found a penny heads up, knowing you would now have good luck or maybe you are the person who saw a penny tail-side up and flipped it over for the next passerby! The spiritual significance of a penny is good luck and protection. “A penny from heaven is considered to be left by an angel that was coming across your path – it brings comfort and love.” This significance was taken to the next level with a customized personal touch added by Tiffany. She began adding her personal touch “Be Safe” and “<3” stamps by hand to pennies six years ago and has been giving them to first responders ever since. 

Support First Responders

We are dedicated and proud to build lifesaving equipment to serve first responders. As a small family-run company we believe in treating each customer that steps foot in a BME vehicle as part of our family. Following the journey of each vehicle or engine that leaves our facility allows us to stay connected with the heroes using them each day. We are honored to include Tiffany’s Pennies in this journey sending our clients off with a second layer of protection and well wishes from a caring supporter. Want to learn more about Tiffany or follow her journey? Tiffany’s mom created the Facebook Page Tiffany’s Pennies to share photos, stories and experiences along the way.

BME Emergency Vehicle Upfitting Partners with Local Gun Lock Manufacturer

bme upfitting partners with blac-rac gun locks

To uphold our commitment to building the safest, most durable apparatus, we are meticulous in choosing the products we rely on to build BME fire apparatus. That care extends to every division of the Boise Mobile Equipment team, including BME Emergency Vehicle Upfitting. As the largest regional upfitter of fire command and law enforcement vehicles, it is crucial that the equipment we use from radios and consoles to lighting and firearm security meet our high standards of excellence. 

Locally Manufactured, Internationally Installed

As an Idaho-based manufacturer that started from humble beginnings, we appreciate working with local small businesses that are as dedicated to safety and quality as BME. But Blac-Rac Manufacturing’s Boise-based production wasn’t what first led us to their gun locks. In fact, it was a YouTube video showing how different gun locks respond to break-in attempts that initially caught our eye, sent to us by a client looking for superior firearm security. 

That being said, we are very proud to have these internationally trusted gun locks manufactured in our neck of the woods. From their Boise, Idaho factory, Blac-Rac has shipped over 70,000 gun locks worldwide, including 6 different countries, 53 military bases, and 60,000 law enforcement agencies.

blac-rac manufacturing factory in boise

Over our two years of experience with Blac-Rac Manufacturing, we have found their gun locks to be one of the most secure and durable weapon retention systems on the market. With all steel construction and covered take-down pins, Blac-Rac makes their gun locks virtually impossible to break into by the average thief. Its versatile design also makes it a popular gun mount among our law enforcement clients, clamping around the lower receiver of the firearm to accommodate a wide range of weapon types and optics. These factors, along with quick deployment times and easy installation, make the Blac-Rac our go-to gun lock for police vehicle upfits.

emergency vehicle upfitting

A One-Stop Shop for First Responders

When we upfit fire and law vehicles at BME Emergency Vehicle Upfitting, quality is our top priority. While our clients appreciate the quick turnaround times that we pride ourselves on, we will never sacrifice quality in the process. Working with reliable companies like Blac-Rac Manufacturing is part of what makes that possible. As with BME Fire Trucks, our clients can trust that every vehicle we upfit will exemplify the BME Difference, providing safety, durability, and quality performance in the line of duty.

If your department is looking for a reliable emergency vehicle upfitter, visit our upfitting services page or email upfitting@bmefire.com for more information.

BME Receives Three Year BPA from the U.S. Department of Interior

BME Receives 3 Year BPA

Boise Mobile Equipment (BME) received a three year Blanket Purchase Agreement to produce Wildland Crew Carriers for the U.S. Department of Interior in March. BME will produce twenty-four crew carriers in its initial year of the Bid. 

“The Department of the Interior (DOI) conserves and manages the Nation’s natural resources and cultural heritage for the benefit and enjoyment of the American people, provides scientific and other information about natural resources and natural hazards to address societal challenges and create opportunities for the American people, and honors the Nation’s trust responsibilities or special commitments to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and affiliated island communities to help them prosper.” 

The Initial 24 Units:

The BME Crew Carrier is built to handle rugged terrain. This rugged durability allows firefighters to respond to wildland fires quickly, safely, and comfortably. The tubular skeleton increases roll-over protection and safety for your crew in all situations.

Structural Integrity Test

We build our bodies to the highest standards of safety and durability. In order to build the best crew carriers for the Department of Interior we have built a tubular steel constructed body that will be sent to Cape Testing with IMMI in Indiana to have a Structural Integrity Test to be performed on. This testing is being done to meet the NFPA 1906 Standards 10.4.1 Structural Integrity – Roof Loading and 10.4.3 Structural Integrity – Side Loading.

Development & Production Timeline

crew carrier production

Engineer Drawing

crew bus engineer drawing

Crew Carrier Specifications

  • Freightliner® M2 106 Conventional Chassis
  • Cummins® L9 330EV HP Engine
  • Allison® 3000 EVS Transmission
  • Seating for 10 Personnel
  • Tubular Steel Constructed Body
  • Air Horn
  • Battery Charger & Inverter
  • Multiplex Electrical System
  • Lighting Packages (vary on build)

If your department is in need of a Wildland Crew Carrier we have the best-looking, most comfortable, and safest vehicle in its class. Personal space, comfortable seats, and overall design make our Crew Carriers the right choice for your team. For more information on the BME Crew Carriers please visit this page or contact sales@bmefire.com 

Our Commitment to Firefighters

firefighters with bme fire truck
Photo Credit: South Metro Fire Rescue 2018

It’s no secret that firefighters face a unique set of hazards when responding to a fire, whether structure or wildland. Firefighting equipment or gear failing should not be a concern when operating in dangerous environments. We know that while each apparatus we build plays a role in firefighting efforts, it is ultimately the firefighters who put in the hard work, risking their lives to protect our communities day in and day out. For this reason we are invested in the safety and experiences of each individual firefighter and department that steps foot in a BME apparatus.

As a small family-run company, we believe in treating our clients as one of our own, from our initial meeting to thirty years down the line. We are dedicated and proud to build lifesaving equipment; nothing is more rewarding than seeing our apparatus perform in the field. We strive to innovate wildland apparatus, manufacturing processes, and the way we interact with each member of the BME family.

When you join the BME family you have the guarantee of apparatus safety and support long after delivery. Throughout the years we have built connections with the firefighters that use our apparatus, listening to each client and using their feedback to guide our innovations. Our inspiration for safety comes from following the stories of the men and women on the front lines.

We Are Wildland

To bring our family together we have created a motto: We Are Wildland. This is more than just a slogan we use, it’s a statement that represents the firefighters we are proud to serve and a precedent we have set as a manufacturer. We offer the safest wildland apparatus on the market and it’s a result of the brave men and women who operate them. When you see the BME logo or We Are Wildland on an engine, shirt, hat, or sticker, you’ll know it has been built to the utmost standards of quality and durability. 

Firefighters wearing the BME badge is a great honor. We wouldn’t be where we are today if it weren’t for agencies like the US Forest Service or CAL FIRE trusting in us. Support from municipal departments has allowed us to grow in our custom apparatus capabilities. As proud as we are to see others wearing the BME badge, we believe firefighters are proud to be a part of our family. Our annual calendar wouldn’t be possible without the support of departments who have purchased our apparatus and captured photos of them in the field. 

We would like to personally thank each employee, department, agency and vendor that has contributed to the growth of Boise Mobile Equipment. Amazing vendors like WhelenTomarDarleyHannay Reels, Cox Reels, Elkhart BrassUPFFoam ProHale and many more allow us to build quality products. Our marketing efforts are supported by great companies like Silverline FilmsSOLVUprintingBSN Sports, Firehouse Magazine, Fire Engineering Magazine, and Sticker MuleCustom vinyl stickers have allowed us to show off our BME logo but also design items focused on the firefighters we serve.

FROM OUR BME FAMILY

Safety Starts Here

Safer, more effective firefighting begins with a dependable, high-quality BME Wildland Fire Apparatus. We continue in our commitment to not only build the best in the industry, but also, the safest. We are often asked what makes a BME fire engine different from other manufacturers, we made this video to show you what sets us apart from the competition. Thank you to Silverline Films for creating this video.

Firefighters Have Twice the Risk to Develop Mesothelioma, Says Study

Firefighters Have Twice the Risk to Develop Mesothelioma, Says Study

Guest Post By: Mesothelioma Guide  

Written By: Andrew Devine

The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have teamed up to study the causal relationship between firefighting and diseases such as mesothelioma. The study found that firefighters have a substantially higher risk of developing mesothelioma than the general population.

Firefighters are a group of people that have one of the more notable risks for developing mesothelioma. These risks aren’t hard to imagine when considering the amount of debris and toxins released into the air when an older building burns down.

The smoke and dust generated from these fires are likely to contain unsafe levels of asbestos. When structures are on fire and when they collapse, asbestos fibers present in the structure become airborne.

There are also unforeseen risks that firefighters serving prior to the 1970s may have incurred. Such a risk is the use of asbestos in the protective materials worn by firefighters prior to this period. Since the risks of asbestos were not widely known, it seemed logical at the time to manufacture helmets, coats and pants with fire-resistant asbestos.

While firefighters today have protective equipment, such as masks and respirators, it is not always a requirement for them to use the equipment. This obviously puts firefighters at risk of exposure if asbestos is present.

Background of the Study

The idea behind the study was to create a more conclusive understanding of the occupational risks of firefighting and developing cancer. By increasing the amount of participants in the study, researchers hope to back up previous studies with a more scientifically significant analysis.

The study consisted of nearly 30,000 career firefighters who served between 1950 and 2009 in San Francisco, Chicago and Philadelphia.

While the research does not consider factors such as smoking, personal health and consumption of alcohol, they did determine that firefighters are twice as likely to develop mesothelioma compared to the general population.

This was the first study ever to identify higher rates of mesothelioma among firefighters in the United States. It also found that firefighters have a higher rates of developing several other types of cancer.

The study is projected to have a second phase in which researchers will look at the occupational history of the firefighters in this study to gain more specific information about the relationship of firefighting and the development of cancers like mesothelioma.

9/11: A Recent Example of Asbestos Risks for Firefighters

One of the most infamous asbestos exposure risks for firefighters were those who served at Ground Zero on 9/11. The lower floors of the Twin Towers were coated in tons (estimated between 400 and 1,000 tons) of asbestos that was released into the air when the buildings collapsed.

The dust cloud resulting from the collapse swamped lower Manhattan, engulfing skyscrapers and people. Those without respirators were sure to inhale the toxic dust.

A study released a year after 9/11 by the American Thoracic Society highlighted the risks associated with asbestos exposure for firefighters at Ground Zero.

Although the study wasn’t speculative about firefighters developing mesothelioma in the future, it determined there was a significant amount of asbestos released in the air after the collapse.

The study did, however, determine that firefighters at Ground Zero had immediate respiratory side effects, including pleural effusions and pleural thickening. These are serious symptoms, which illuminate the risks firefighters must face.

There isn’t any event comparable in magnitude that posed risks to firefighters quite like 9/11. However, it does go to show that firefighters responding to calls involving buildings containing asbestos face an inevitable risk of being exposed to dangerous levels of asbestos.

Why Is This Study Important?

The study released by the USFA and NIOSH is important for many reasons, but one reason stands out in relation to mesothelioma: awareness. Knowing that firefighters have two times the risk of developing mesothelioma than the average American is powerful information.

This is information that can be used to help protect firefighters from unseen, airborne risks such as asbestos. It may also encourage firefighters who are tempted to remove their respirators to protect themselves.

Many people are still unaware of the potential threat of asbestos exposure. The toxic fibers are regulated in the U.S., but they still aren’t banned. Firefighters, especially, need to be aware of these risks.

 

About the Writer, Andrew Devine

Andrew Devine is a contributing writer for Mesothelioma Guide. He has developed an interest in educating patients and their families on everything from new treatments to what to expect after diagnosis.

Boise Mobile Equipment | We Are Wildland Video

Wildfires are a force of nature that threaten everything in their path, yet brave men and women risk their lives to keep this force contained. Boise Mobile Equipment Wildland Fire Apparatus are designed and manufactured to the utmost demanding performance and durability standards. We continue in our commitment to not only build the best in the industry, but also, the safest. We are often asked what makes a BME fire engine different from other manufacturers, we made this video to show you what sets us apart from the competition. 

Tubular constructed bodies provide an added layer of safety and durability in some of the harshest and most rugged environments. Safer, more effective firefighting begins with a dependable, high-quality BME Wildland Fire Apparatus. Thank you to Silverline Films for creating this video.

BME Statement on Coronavirus

To our valued clients, 

As the landscape regarding Coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to develop, we are closely monitoring the situation and are adhering to the governments, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization’s guidelines on all aspects of safe working, quarantine and traveling. Our highest priority is the health and safety of our employees and the first responders we serve. We will continue manufacturing fire apparatus as long as it is safe to do so and supplies are available. We have prepared for a number of contingencies to minimize the risk and disruption to our business operations, employees, and customers.

In an effort to protect Boise Mobile Equipment employees, visiting personnel and client receiving engines we have implemented the following:

  • No tours of the facilities at this time
  • Limiting number of personnel visiting for meetings at our facility
  • Shortening time spent on the shop floor of visiting departments
  • Delivering engines with a pilot vehicle to eliminate flying
  • Preventative measures for at risk employees

We will assess the situation daily and update our manufacturing plans accordingly during this time. Please be assured that we will continue to work diligently to ensure the processes, infrastructure and safeguards we have in place, to continue delivering a quality fire apparatus and customer service.

From the team at Boise Mobile Equipment

Community Honors Idaho Fallen Firefighters

idaho fallen firefighters statue by rusty talbot
A bronze statue, created by Idaho artist Agnes Vincent "Rusty" Talbot, stands at the center of the Idaho Fallen Firefighters Memorial Plaza where communities from across Idaho gather to remember the firefighters who sacrificed their lives in the line of duty.

Firefighters from across Idaho gathered on Friday, September 6 to remember and honor their fallen comrades at the annual Idaho Fallen Firefighters Memorial Ceremony. Both the ceremony and its venue, the Idaho Fallen Firefighters Memorial Park, were steeped in time-honored tradition, a moving tribute to the men and women who sacrificed everything to protect their communities.

The ceremony opened to the rousing call of pipes and drums. The Boise Fire Department Pipe & Drum Band and a statewide honor guard filed down the greenway to raise the flags of country, state, and community, marching past a wall of names. Speakers took the podium to honor and reflect upon the legacy of those names.

“They were the epitome of humility when it came to doing the job they did,” said Boise Fire Department Chief Dennis Doan. “Never wanting to bring the spotlight of attention on themselves for their work protecting others.”

It is only fitting, then, that they be honored and remembered for their selfless acts of courage. At the center of the plaza stands a life-size bronze statue of three firefighters, one fallen in the line of duty. His brothers support and mourn him. It serves as a moving representation of the unique bond shared among the fire community, and their incredible commitment and sacrifice.

idaho honor guard closes memorial ceremony
The honor guard marches back down the plaza to close the Idaho Fallen Firefighters Memorial Ceremony.
ringing the bell to honor fallen firefighters
A member of the honor guard rings a bell to pay tribute to each of Idaho's fallen firefighters.

A Legacy of Tradition

Traditions are also shared among the fire community, and several were observed in the course of the ceremony. Pipes and drums, preceded by the “ringing of the bell,” concluded the ceremony in respectful remembrance. Two bells were rung three times for each name that was read, signalling honor to those who had fallen in the line of duty. Members of the Honor Guard laid roses at the foot of the statue for each of the fallen.

firefighters memorial salute
A member of the honor guard salutes in respect after laying a rose in memory of one of Idaho's fallen firefighters.

But there are other traditions, as Coeur d’Alene Fire Department Chief Kenny Gabriel pointed out, that are better left in the past. “In my career I’ve seen huge changes…the days where wearing a breathing apparatus was a show of weakness,” he said in a call for cultivating a “culture of safety” in the fire industry. Cancer, heart disease, roadway incidents, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have claimed far too many lives, and there are more steps, he urged the community, that can be taken to prevent them. 

Indeed, PTSD and suicide are both major threats facing first responders. A Ruderman Family Foundation study found that suicides were more common among firefighters and police officers in 2017 than line-of-duty deaths. It is an issue that the nation’s fire community has been increasing their efforts to tackle by providing resources for their comrades struggling with mental health. A number of those resources are listed below, including mental health and suicide prevention hotlines.

Supporting Idaho Firefighters

Support for the fire community continues to be an important part of local and statewide organizations. Boise Mayor Dave Bieter recounted the city’s efforts in securing a riverside location for the Idaho Fallen Firefighters Memorial Park eleven years ago, and extended the city’s support to the Boise Fire Training Facility. “Whatever we can do in the city of Boise to help you,” he said, “please don’t hesitate to call.” 

The Idaho Fallen Firefighters Foundation is another key supporter of the state’s firefighters. Their joint effort with the city of Boise founded the Idaho Fallen Firefighters Memorial Park in 2008. Tyler Roundtree, speaking at this park more than a decade later, summed up the foundation’s mission: “We believe it is our goal to touch the hearts of all family members, supporting you today, and providing you the recognition you all deserve.”

Today the Idaho Fallen Firefighters Foundation continues their mission to honor the lives of firefighters who have died in the line of duty, provide support for their families, and promote the health and safety of Idaho firefighters. The organization holds community events to fund these efforts, including the annual Boise Mustache Memorial Ride

At Boise Mobile Equipment, it is the unparalleled devotion and camaraderie of the fire community that inspires us to build safe and reliable fire apparatus. We are proud to serve this industry of heroes in our state and across the nation.

Firefighter Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Resources

Wildland Fire Engines Around The World

fire engines around the world

Wildfires can happen anywhere in the world, but every country has their own way of tackling this threat. This includes their wildland fire engines, which can vary vastly across the world according to different geographical needs, types of structures being protected, firefighting tactics, and additional uses. Builds, classifications, standards, and striping are all different across borders. We scoured the internet to see what our global neighbors operate to fight their countries’ wildfires, whether it were unimogs or response vehicles or offroad ATVs, and compiled a list of our most interesting finds. 

Don’t see your country represented? Email marketing@bmefire.com with your country’s wildland engine and we’ll add it to the list.

Argentina

argentina wildland unimog
Photo by Patricio, fire-engine-photos.com

Unimog 416

Operated by Bomberos Voluntarios de Pinamar
Manufacturer: Mercedes-Benz

Australia

Unimog Tanker

Operated by Forest Fire Management Victoria
Manufacturer: Mercedes-Benz
Water tank: 1057 gal. / 4000 L

Bavaria

HLF 10/6

Operated by the Bavarian Gmain Fire Brigade
Manufacturer: Mercedes-Benz
Water tank: 159 gal. / 600 L

Belgium

Belgium forest firefighting engine
Photo by Marcel Sloover, fire-engine-photos.com

Heusden-Zolder MAN

Used for forest firefighting and military purposes
Manufacturer: MAN
Water tank: 1585 gal. / 6000 L

Canada

Canada wildland engine
Photo by Marcel Sloover, fire-engine-photos.com

Wildlands 19

Operated by Vancouver FD
Manufacturer: HUB Fire Engines
Water tank: 250 gal. / 946 L

Chile

Forestal de Magirus

The first forest unit in Chile built by Magirus
Manufacturer: Magirus
Water tank: 793 gal. / 3000 L

China

Forest Fire Control Truck

Small tank forest fire engine
Manufacturer: Hubei Jiangnan Special Automobile Co.
Water tank: 527 gal. / 1995 L

Costa Rica

Zetros 2733 6×6

All-emergency response engine, operated by the Benemérito Cuerpo de Bomberos de Costa Rica
Manufacturer: Mercedes-Benz
Water tank: Includes space for portable water tank

Croatia

Croatia wildland unimog
Photo by Dino Penić, fire-engine-photos.com

Mercedes Unimog U20 TLF

Operated by the Šibenik Professional Fire Brigade
Manufacturer: Ziegler
Water tank: 660 gal. / 2500 L

France

Forest Fire Tank Truck CCF

Forest fire and civil defense engine
Manufacturer: Sides
Water tank: 1188 gal. / 4500 L

Germany

Unimog U 5023

Operated by Kirchzarten Volunteer Fire Brigade
Manufacturer: Ziegler
Water tank: 1057 gal. / 4000 L

Hungary

Hungary forestry response engine
Photo by Terry Yip, fire-engine-photos.com

Forestry Response Unimog

Operated in Kecskemet, Hungary
Manufacturer: Rosenbauer
Water tank: 713 gal. / 2700 L

India

Quick Response Vehicle

Includes hoses, water and foam tanks
Manufacturer: Brijbasi Hi-Tech Udyog ltd.
Water tank: 92–159 gal. / 350–600 L

Indonesia

Matra Municipal Fire Truck

Includes pump and roll capabilities
Manufacturer: PT. Matra Perkasa Utama
Water tank: 793–1321 gal. / 3000–5000 L

Ireland

Ford Ranger 4×4

Operated by Elphin Fire Station
Manufacturer: Sídheán Teo

Israel

Israel forest fire unit
Photo by Richard Jud, fire-engine-photos.com

Forest Fire Unit

Operated in Jerusalem
Manufacturer: MAN
Water tank: 977 gal. / 3700 Liter

Italy

ABF 5000

Forestry fire truck / civil defense engine 
Manufacturer: Chinetti
Water tank: 1321 gal. / 5000 L

Japan

Red Ladybug

Off-road rescue for quick disaster response
Manufacturer: Morita Group

Luxembourg

Unimog U 20

Operated by The Civilian Protection Authority
Manufacturer: Gimaex-Schmitz 
Water tank: 528 gal. / 2000 L

Mexico

Mexico forestry fire unit
Photo by Carlos Alberto Camarena, fire-engine-photos.com

Unidad 9 SFR Forestry Unit

Operated by Bomberos San Francisco del Rincon
Manufacturer: GMC

The Netherlands

Mercedes-Benz 4×4 U530 Unimog Forest Fire Engine

Small brush truck for grassland and bush fires
Manufacturer: Ziegler
Water tank: 793 gal. / 3000 L

New Zealand

New Zealand smokerchaser fire unit
Photo by David Miller, fire-engine-photos.com

Smokechaser Vehicle

Operated by Christchurch City Council
Manufacturer: Mazda

Norway

Norway wildland unimog
Photo by Jan Scheele, fire-engine-photos.com

Unimog 416

In service 1972-2004 in Oslo, Norway
Manufacturer: Rosenbauer
Water tank: 330 gal. / 1250 L

Portugal

Forest Firefighting Vehicle (FFFV)

For rural and forest fire response
Manufacturer: Jacinto
Water Tank: 793 gal. / 3000 L

Russia

Floating Vehicle AZ-4,0

Fire engine that doubles as a rescue boat
Manufacturer: Fire Group Ltd.
Water tank: 793 gal. / 3000 L

Slovenia

Slovenia Pivka wildfire engine
Photo by Sandi Grzetič, fire-engine-photos.com

Pivka TAM 110

Wildfire engine with space for storing handheld equipment
Manufacturer: TAM
Water tank: 449 gal. / 1700 L

South Africa

Forest Fire Engine

Built to uniquely handle African bush and forest fire suppression
Manufacturer: Kinsey Steel Industries

South Korea

Firefighting Bike

For maneuvering rough or damaged roads
Manufacturer: Nanomedics

Spain

Spain wildland forestry tank
Photo by peterlbit, fire-engine-photos.com

Forestry Tank

Operated in Cartagena, Spain
Manufacturer: Iveco
Water tank: 1849 gal. / 7000 L

Sweden

Scania XT P 370 Fire Tanker Truck

Operated by Eksjö Rescue Services
Manufacturer: Scania
Water tank: 1585 gal. / 6000 L

United Arab Emirates

Iveco 4×4 Fire Truck

Built in 1996
Manufacturer: Magirus

United Kingdom

Incident Response Unit – Land Rover

Offroad unit designed to carry firefighting and rescue equipment
Manufacturer: Angloco

United States of America

BME CAL FIRE type 3 model 34 wildland apparatus
Photo by Boise Mobile Equipment

Wildland Type 3 Model 34

Operated by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE)
Manufacturer: Boise Mobile Equipment
Water tank: 500 gal. / 1893 L

Wales

Quad ATV

Operated by South Wales Fire and Rescue Service
Manufacturer: Polaris

We’re not perfect…See a mistake? Let us know by emailing marketing@bmefire.com.

Types of Fire Engines & Water Tenders

types of fire engines

We are often asked what the main differences are among the fire engines we build. Though Boise Mobile Equipment (BME) is largely known for safe and durable wildland fire engines, we manufacture a wide range of apparatus for virtually any fire incident.

So how does the fire industry classify different types of fire engines? You may have seen our blog outlining the seven main categories of apparatus and their functions. We wanted to display this content in an easy-to-read chart that can be seen at a glance. That’s why we took the National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG) Typing Standards chart and gave it a face lift, making it more accessible to the average viewer.

standards for types of fire engines

But firefighting vehicles don’t stop there. There are several other types of rigs that firefighters use on the line, including Water Tenders. We’ve also listed the different models and requirements for water-transporting vehicles, as defined by the NWCG Typing Standards.

At BME, we’re dedicated to providing departments with the right apparatus, whether it be a Type 3 Fire Engine, a Type 6 Brush Truck, or a Type 1 Pumper. Need something that falls outside these categories? We offer completely custom builds to meet the specific requirements of every department, like this Emergency Response Unit for Santa Fe Springs. BME builds a wide selection of apparatus to tackle any situation.

Scroll to top Call Now Button