NFPA

Recent Active Shooter Incidents Prompt NFPA to Fast Track Standards for First Responders

nfpa shooter response

Recent shootings like the Florida school shooting earlier this month have no doubt sparked debate and controversy over effective response and prevention methods. During the last five years the United States has been inundated with at least 14 prominent, high-casualty producing active shooter incidents. This has forced police, fire, and EMS to change tactics to handle these unfortunate incidents. The locations where incidents occur have been shown to be a school, an office complex, a fast food restaurant, a warehouse, or as you are passing by a freeway overpass. It is clear that this type of situation requires all agencies to practice readiness and have a clear understanding of what actions are needed, who should take them, and when. Police organizations already have been training their personnel with Immediate Action-Rapid Deployment tactics. This training employs immediate deployment of law enforcement resources to ongoing, life-threatening situations where delayed deployment could otherwise result in death or injury to innocent persons. The introduction of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 3000, Standard for Preparedness and Response to Active Shooter and/or Hostile Events seeks to provide direction to fire personnel in the event a situation like this occurs in the future.  Let’s highlight some of the important points of the standard that might help you or your firefighters in the future.

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What is NFPA 1500? Understanding Fire Protection Health and Safety

nfpa 1500

Since the first volunteer Bucket Brigade established by Benjamin Franklin in 1736, firefighting tactics have evolved. Knowledge gained, increased safety measures, new technologies and new hazards born out of modern construction materials are all causes for the historic changes of the firefighting industry. Traditional firefighting tactics involved daredevil driving practices, brazen entry into fully engulfed structures, and a priority of mission accomplishment over that of firefighter safety. In hindsight, we can see that these approaches display a misunderstanding of risk management and more times than not result in firefighter casualties that could have been prevented given the appropriate direction.  

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