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BME Featured in Fire Apparatus Magazine

bme featured in fire apparatus

Boise Mobile Equipment was recently highlighted in a Fire Apparatus Magazine article about discharges and inlets. The article discusses the different assortment of inlets and outlets, according to tactical needs on today’s fire apparatus. Below is a quote from Larry Segreto that was featured in the article.
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Wildland Firefighter Week of Remembrance

Wildland Firefighter

Over many decades, lessons learned from accidents and fatalities that have occurred on wildland fires have led to significant improvements in firefighter education, training, operational practices, and risk management processes. Unfortunately, wildland firefighting remains inherently hazardous, and we continue to experience accidents and fatalities.
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Have you heard… Boise Mobile Equipment is Moving!

bme is moving
BME HAS MOVED TO A LARGER AND MORE FUNCTIONAL BUILDING!

We are proud to announce that due to our remarkable growth and increasing demand, we have moved to a new location. Boise Mobile Equipment (BME) is known best for being the industry leader in the wildland market. We acquired two new facilities: one 25,000 square feet, and one 50,000 square feet, to give us adequate space to produce new firefighting vehicles.

Our new address 5656 W Morris Hill Rd, Boise, is where we will continue to give our customers the same quality service as before. The new location allows more room for manufacturing and innovating product.

The following items will remain the same:

PHONE #

Toll Free: (800) 445-8342
Phone: (208) 338-1444

HOURS

Monday through Friday: 8 am to 5 pm
Saturday and Sunday: Closed

Due to the nature of a large move, some departments may still be at our 900 Boeing Street location until the move is complete. Feel free to contact us with any questions.

Unfortunately, during the move, our phone lines will be down and access to our computers will be limited. If you need to get in contact with the office, please send an email to info@bmefire.com.
We apologize in advance for any inconveniences.

WANT TO CHECK OUT OUR NEW DIGS?

We will be hosting a Facebook Live, sharing photos, and a grand opening will be announced once our move is complete!

The Importance of Home Fire Sprinkler Systems

home fire sprinklers

A vast majority of fire-related deaths in North America happen at home. There is no better time to bring attention to this problem and it’s solution than during this year’s Home Fire Sprinkler Day. Home Fire Sprinkler Day was a project initiated by NFPA’s Fire Sprinkler Initiative, the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition and the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition-Canada. This project tasks fire sprinkler advocates across North America with hosting events on the same day that promote home fire sprinklers.
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Boise Mobile Equipment Lineup at FDIC 2018

FDIC 2018

The world’s most comprehensive training-based conference on firefighting took over Indianapolis, and Boise Mobile Equipment (BME) attended to showcase their latest apparatus and industry expertise. Fire Department Instructors Conference (FDIC) International 2018 took place from April 23–28 in Indianapolis, Indiana, at the Indiana Convention Center and Lucas Oil Stadium. BME’s booth housed two of the Wildland fire apparatus manufacturer’s most recent trucks, including a Model 34 and an Xtreme 6.

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Reading Smoke Signals: How Skilled Firefighters Use Smoke to Determine the Characteristics of a Fire

firefighters reading smoke signals

One of the most important skills all firemen must possess in his situational awareness tool bag is the ability to read smoke.  A fire and its subsequent smoke does not delineate between incident commander, officer, operator or a probationary member. Though not an exact science and heralded as only privy to experienced crew members, the ability to read the smoke at any position within the company can help those responding to the incident make better tactical decisions.  Consequently, everyone at the incident should be armed with the ability to read smoke. Smoke can help first responders determine the fires location, growth, toxicity, direction of travel. In the case of a structure fire it helps us predict hostile fire events like smoke explosions, backdrafts and flashovers. In fact, the author of The Art of Reading Smoke, David W. Dodson a fireman that has spent 33 years learning and teaching on the subject says: “Reading smoke can tell us what is happening now and, more importantly, what is going to happen in the future,” said Dodson. “Reading smoke can tell us how big or intense a fire is, maybe where the fire is,” he said. “Watching how fast it is changing can tell if we have seconds or minutes before something happens.”

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How to Justify Your Fire Budget When Seeking Government Aid

type 1 fire pumper

Institutions like well-funded schools and effective law enforcement are often a gauge for the value and health of any community. They attract business that is essential for growth and stability. For many communities, the public coffers are limited and desperate, forcing these public institutions to compete for dollars in any way they can. They’re using advanced metrics to justify their budgets while committees use these metrics to judge the institution’s value to the community. Throw in other concerns, such as real estate values and insurance premiums, and you can have a very complex system to measure the effectiveness and value of what one organization brings to the community.

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How to Recruit More Volunteer Firefighters

The first organized volunteer firefighting service has a rich history dating back to early Eighteenth century in Boston.  In 1711 the Mutual Fire Societies was formed to combat the ever growing presence of destructive fires in the fast growing English Colonies.  The early group of volunteers was described by Benjamin Franklin, a prominent volunteer firefighter, as “a club or society of active men belonging to each fire engine, whose business is to attend all fires with it whenever they happen.”  The premise was simple, when fire emerged from a member of the Mutual Fire Society’s dwelling, other members of the club mobilized into organized units to battle the blaze.  Each society had approximately twenty members and is credited with being the first volunteer brigade of firefighters. As residents sought further protection from fire, statesman such as Franklin took notice.  Franklin’s progressive thought aimed to provide whole communities the advantage of protecting all the property of the community. Formed in Philadelphia, each group of volunteers banded together in small groups of 30.  The demographics of group volunteers represented the diversity that the city was experiencing in the early 1700s, consisting of professionals, merchants, and trades people. The volunteer departments paid for their own equipment and placed it in advantageous places close to a source of water and other firefighting infrastructure.  All groups were aligned with protecting their collective interests in the community and staffing was adequate.

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Types of Fire Engines and How to Distinguish The Differences Between Them

types of apparatus

Fire engines have advanced throughout the last four centuries to help protect the land and citizens of this nation.  The first fire engines were human propelled water pumps with no room for personnel. Around the end of the 1800s, the threat of fire within densely populated areas brought about paid firefighters equipped with horses to pull the early apparatus.  The modern day fire engine emerged in the 1960s armed with water pumps, a reservoir, and enclosed seats for the crew.  As the threats of fire began to change, so did the specialization of the fire engine on scene. In its most basic form, fire engines are equipped with hoses, water, equipment, and personnel that can aggressively fight the fire.  Let’s take a look at how the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 1901, Standard for Automotive Fire Apparatus classifies the vehicles by type and function.

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Why Structural Firefighters Need Wildland PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) Too

wildland fire gear

Everyday firefighters selflessly work in varied and complex environments that increase their risk of injury and death.  Each year the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) releases studies conducted for the previous year to aid in prevention of firefighter loss of life.  They meticulously report on firefighter deaths and injuries to provide national statistics on their frequency, extent, and characteristics.  Earlier this year, the NFPA reported that there were 69 firefighter fatalities and 62,085 firefighter injuries while on duty in 2016.  Of the 69 firefighters who died while on duty in 2016, 39 were volunteer firefighters, 19 were career firefighters, and eight were employees of federal land management agencies.  An important part of the yearly study centers around developing a better understanding of how these fatalities and nonfatal injuries can assist in identifying corrective actions which could help minimize the inherent risks of firefighter work.  One method of data collection utilized by the NFPA is reviewing standardized incident forms. These documents are sent to the fire departments involved in an incident requesting information on the type of protective equipment worn, the ages and ranks of the firefighters injured, and a description of circumstances that led to injury.  A recurring reason cited within the data as one of the factors leading to injury or death was the incorrect use of or absence of personal protective equipment (PPE) worn by the firefighter. PPE designed for the correct task and firefighting ground offers the crew member the ability to perform the job while reducing the risk of injury or loss of life.

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